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5 Leadership Mind Traps and How to Navigate Them!

5 Leadership Mind Traps and How to Navigate Them! Every as soon as in a while, you stumble upon a book that truly gets you “thinking” and maybe even “changing the way you think”. “Unlocking Management Mind Traps: How to Grow in Complexity” by Jennifer Garvey Berger was that book for me. My very first […]

5 Leadership Mind Traps and How to Navigate Them!

5 Leadership Mind Traps and How to Navigate Them!

Every as soon as in a while, you stumble upon a book that truly gets you “thinking” and maybe even “changing the way you think”. “Unlocking Management Mind Traps: How to Grow in Complexity” by Jennifer Garvey Berger was that book for me.

My very first intro to Jennifer was through an online course I took recently (The Art of Developmental Coaching). Jennifer was one of the trainers and I found her to be very appealing and extremely deep in her point of views and truths relating to adult and management advancement.

To quote Jennifer Garvey Berger:

” We are living in this unusual, paradoxical time in our world where the massively increasing intricacy around us might lead us to grow faster and more compassionately and more together, or it might lead us to get more defensive, closed, hard, and smaller.”

There is no doubt that the world in which we work and live is intricate and ending up being significantly more intricate. Simply as we must deal with the complexity “out there” or external to our selves, we are challenged to understand and deal with the complexity “in here” and internal to our selves.

In Jennifer’s book, she describes 5 Mind Traps. The premise is that we act as if the world is simple when in reality the world is rather complex. Acknowledging these mind traps within our selves assists us to see things through a wider lens and supplies us with greater resources for dealing with the actual complexity.

These are the 5 Mind Traps:

1. Easy Stories – We enjoy our stories. Stories typically have a beginning, middle and end and are filled with heroes and bad guys. Frequently, we are the hero in the story and the other person is the bad guy. Our problem-solving nature looks for routes and so the story is riddled with our beliefs and predisposition. Easy stories keep us little and presume a certain result based on the past. One way to broaden beyond our story is to consider the other individual in the story. How might they be thought about a hero?

2. Rightness – Our sense of being “best” allows our decisiveness but on the flip side it can eliminate interest and openness. You may even confuse sensation right with being. Ask yourself “what do I think and how can I be wrong?” There are always 2 sides to a scenario – exploring the other side is excellent practice. Ensure you listen carefully to learn instead of to win or fix things.

3. Contract – We are set to be linked to other people. Agreement satisfies our desire for belonging and connection. In some cases, we want so much to belong that we down play our disagreement. We are oriented to not be socially disconnected because the discomfort of being left out is experienced the very same way as physical discomfort in the body. To release this mind trap, consider how conflict might serve to deepen a relationship. Or how disagreeing might cause expanded thinking and ideas.

4. Control – Our sense of remaining in control is straight connected to our feeling of being happy. In reality, our remaining in control and viewed by others as being in control is often equated with good management. Sometimes terrific leadership needs us to let go of control to enable much better outcomes, especially in intricacy. Ask yourself: What can I assist enable rather of what can I make take place? Or what could make it possible for me/us?

5. Ego – Our sense of who we are assists us operate with function. The individual we are now is a conclusion of our thoughts, experiences, beliefs, to this point in our journey. The problem however, is that we are protective of the person we are being now vs the individual we are ending up being. We believe we have altered in the past however for some reason most likely will not change much progressing. This leads us to want to secure the individual we think we are. For real individual growth to occur, we need to pay attention to the map of our own development and ask ourselves “who would I like to be next?”

5 Leadership Mind Traps and How to Navigate Them! 2

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